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20130104
20130112
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
of these signatures say the same thing. they both belong to treasury secretary tim geithner, who by virtue of being treasury secretary is also the guy who gets to sign our money. when mr. geithner became treasury secretary, he changed his signature. he changed it from the rather lovely loop de loops on the left to the fifth grader's cursive timothy f. geithner you see on the right. here he is explaining why. >> i think on the dollar bill i had to write something that people could read my name. i didn't try for elegance. i just tried for elegance. >> because mrs. quigley, the first grade writing teach worry have given me an "f" on that. >> i took third grade in new delhi, india. >> whether it is foreign penmanship instruction or something weirder, tim geithner's changed signature never got nearly the attention that his successor's signature received. all of the media got fixated on a signature that is loopier than tim geithner's original signature. this is jack lew. all signs point to president obama say i knowing him to replace tim geithner. and if he is nominated and confirmed, that will mean that
of the treasury department. when we began this fiscal slope, curve, cliff discussion, tim geithner was involved, there was a sense jack lew would be involved. they were marginalized towards the end, and as glenn mentions, vice president biden was the guy to sweep in at the last minute to make the deal. congressional republicans sound like they don't really want to work with him. is that a problem for the administration? >> yes and no. the administration has done this in the past, you bring in the heavy to close the deal. it's like when you're trying to discipline your children, don't wait till your father gets home, you can kind of keep jack lew in the background to bring in him. there's a view of having someone who's strong, lew is not a fist pounder. lew derives his authority and respect from the command of the issues, and i don't mean the command of the issues, i mean the command of the numbers. he can dig down, divide fractions in his head. that's why he's a danger and threat to some house republicans. this isn't meant to be negative about the house republicans. they don't simply have sort
. tim geithner expected to leave . jack lu is the leading candidate. how would you vote on lu? >> guest: i would have to look at his record and listen to what he has to say. i tell you my view on any treasury secretary would be that i would want to hear real proposals for growth. the whole debate about the fiscal cliff talking about taxes and spending. noticeably absent from the equation is growth and the biggest economic problem of the last four years is dismal economic growth and under barak obama our economy has grown 1.5 percent a year for years and that is less than half the historical adane. >> john: i would like to get into that in a second. do you share the distaste of the jack lu and the way he conducted his self in the diabetic ceiling debate in 20len. a lot of people said he was arrogant. >> guest: i was not there and i have not dealt with the man and so i will keep an open mind. with any treasury secretary nominee, my view will be looking to the substance, and this is not a popularity contest. this is about fixing the problems that are affecting millions of americans. you kn
answer, because you have seen your name floated out there as a possible successor to tim geithner. >> and the reason i say that is look, i -- i'm 67 years old. i have been gone from home for over a dozen years, doing various public service things. and i have come home, i have got nine grandchildren under seven, and i really want to stay home. so i don't want a full-time job either in the public or private sector. >> one final question, how disappointed were you that the president rejected the simpson-bowles recommendations? >> well, look, i was disappointed at the time. but i came to understand was that his goal was to use it as a framework for his discussions that he had with speaker boehner back in gosh, almost two years ago now. in his first effort to get a grand bargain. he felt that was the best way to be successful. if he had been right, he would have proven to be a political genius. unifor unfortunately, he was not. they didn't get a deal one and i was very disappointed. >> yeah, i think that was an historic moment to get that grand bargain. i know you worked hard on it wit
, possibly right before that with tim geithner's private calculations. >> how real is the concern among congressional democrats that as you crawl from crisis to crisis that it prevents the administration from advancing with long-range policies with regard to imgramigration or gun control. >> i don't think it should. the administration has enormous powers under existing law. for instance, they could institute large parts of the cap and trade bill which passed the house through regulation, through rule making and the president actually did institute a large part of what would have been our bill on immigration, the dream act through administrative action. the president has a lot of power and he should use it to solve the country's problems. >> how would you characterize your last stint in congress. how would you characterize that compared to this upcoming stint? >> well, we did a lot of good for a lot of people, particularly in our district and i think they'll be able to do it again. a lot of the best things that we did in the district had nothing to do with votes on the floor and the job
of staff jack lew of management and budget is considered to be tim geithner's most likely successor and that's deputy national security adviser denis mcdonough. anything could change, but those could be the most likely picks. other members of the administration suggest they're heading for the exits and you would assume the stuff starts ranking up in the next week or so. lisa jackson announced her departure at the end of january and rebecca blank who took over in june after secretary bryson went on medical leave. also expected to leave ray lahood and ken salazar and steven chu. likely with appointments of lew and mcdonough you'll hear more voices demanding more diversity in that cabinet, if you will. how does the president end up solving that problem and create a cabinet that, "looks like america." >>> all right, picking a fight over the president's pentagon pick. one thing the left and the right can agree on. chuck hagel may have an uphill battle in the senate. next, we'll get the view from both sides. former romney campaign adviser dan seymour and dan clemens will be here for a deb
. >> chip, what do you think? tim geithner stepping down. how do you think it's going to impact? do you think, either of you, if the president were to ask tim geithner to stick around at least through that, like, listen, friend, can you extend this another six weeks because i don't want to go through a nomination fight in the middle of all of this as well, don't you think tim geithner would say okay? >> one thing i learned in politics, if the president of the united states asks you to do something, you usually do it. you do it enthusiastically. i think timothy geithner, i agree with what jimmy was saying, i think he knew for a long time he was leaving. they've had a long time to get their successor in place. i think it is going to be jack lew for a variety of reasons. in this fiscal cliff debate, we saw jack on the sideline and not fighting with the senators. think he was saving him for this nomination process. i think it is going to be jack. >> good to see you both. thanks, guys. >>> today's twitter question is how much control should congress have over a president's cabinet pick? here
is nominated to replace tim geithner. i want to get into the gun control. the results of the rasmussen poll, 51% of americans now support stricter gun laws. when asked would posting an armed guard in every school makes schools more safe, 48% said yes and 53% said they would feel safer with an armed guard at school versus no adults with guns. castigatederre was cassty for suggesting that. >> the american people are quite smart in that poll. wayne la pierre was saying armed guards instead of controls on guns. the american people are more supportive of gun control. you know, if you go back and you look at studies and you impact of gun control. there aren't a lot that show that it works in it terms of celling violence. there is one case where it did work and that is australia where are there was a mass shooting in the '90s. 35 tourists were killed and they put in an assault weapons ban that was much stricter than it was here and did a buyback program. politically i agree it would be tough sledding here but at least get a lot of those guns that put multiple bullet holes in the children at newtown ou
that, if you remember in the discussions about the fiscal cliff when tim geithner delivers to the republicans the initial offer they don't come back with a counteroffer that says if you want those revenues we want entitlement cuts. they then say to the administration "we want you to propose entitlement cuts so we can turn around and say look you proposed entitlement cuts." so i don't know which it is. i know that in the long run all the economists are going to agree what the root of the challenge. is it's the aging of the the population, rising health care costs and we don't have the tax revenue to cover that. it's not based on excessive spending on food stamps. it's not based on discretionary spending. that is not what the problem is. >> rose: david? >> i think it's significant if republicans have decided they want this next round to be about entitlements rather than spending. because there is no solution in discretionary spending. >> rose: exactly. >> there's not enough money there. >> rose: everything knows that, don't they? i'm surprised everybody doesn't accept that id
they want to make will be on the debt ceiling. and ironically, i think if as tim geithner did, the secretary of the treasury, float this idea of abolishing the law that requires a congressional vote, that sort of the ultimate threat that the president has. whether he can get that through or not. but that's the ultimate nightmare for the tea party. >> quickly both of you gentlemen, i want your take on the filibuster reform that is pending. there is a lot of commentary being given in the senate about what should be done. would this make it a toxic atmosphere, eugene, if harry reid goes for the full ball of wax and really smokes them out the way they have been filibustering and changes the rule? what does that do to debt ceiling negotiations, if anything? >> well, i think it probably exacerbates the tensions and the bad feelings in the senate, and where the feelings are not that bad right now. i don't know that he will try to push forward on that. >> what than, howard? >> i think he might try it. i think he is being pushed to try it by liberal constituencies who might see that as a payback for
, the mask is off the white house. there's no pretense that they have an interest in spending and when tim geithner's first offer in the negotiations was $1.6 trillion in new revenue, raise the debt ceiling with impunity and have more stimulus spending, that unbridled foolishness that has jarred the gop and the house. so those sort of shutdown questions become easier to coalescing. >> so it's a yes? it's on the table, is that right? >> well, as you and i have talked before, my home state is illinois, which is an example of what not to do. they chose revenues at a state level, didn't deal with the underlying spending drivers and what happened? higher than average unemployment, more per capita debt than any other state in the union almost and been downgraded twice. $7 billion in unpaid bills after the revenues come in. so i'm sensing just in talking to a lot of colleagues today and over the past couple of days a higher level of interest in going much further than they have ever gone before. >> last one, are all revenues off the table as far as you and the house leadership is concerned? >> ye
tim geithner is going to leave possibly by the end of the month, which means ahead of all of the debt ceiling talks. do you think that would hurt the economy if he's not there to be the one to help sort of, i don't know, keep everything on balance? >> i do worry a little bit about this. there's no clear person who would have been named if he's leaving at the end of the month. the name tossed around most commonly is jack lew. but he's not a clear candidate yet at least. secretary geithner has been very instrumental in talking to the congress for the last couple years about the budget and about the debt ceiling. he was very involved in 2011. he's obviously been very involved the last couple of months. if he leaves, i think we could -- it really depends who takes over for him. but i think we're -- i think we're looking at a lot of big issues to face before march and so it's really going to come down to who that person is that takes over. >> yeah, certainly. have to talk a little bit of football because we always talk about the commercials and the super bowl and how much money they bring
will be replaced by who knows. tim geithner is out. he'll be replaced by a guy, jack lew, the guy who, if you've been watching the tv over the last day or so, jack lew is the guy who signs his name with what surely looks like a slinky. >>brian: front page "where are the women?" they take a picture and talk about the cabinet of the administration. all the women are being replaced by men. white men too on top of that. let me show you a picture in "the new york times." all we see is valerie jar rhett's leg -- valerie jarrett's leg. >>steve: on december 29 that is the pr-z meeting with ten guys and they're talking about the fiscal cliff. >>brian: could they back up a little. >>gretchen: this is a picture they released the day after, i believe. and you can see valerie jarrett front and center facing the president. then there are two other women who are in the photos. was it a reaction to that original picture? brian, you bring up a good point that there are no minorities -- there's one, i think, in that original picture. it is an interesting discussion because there was so much made in this last p
attain to. >> exactly. >> tim geithner who apparently jeff sessions thinks is a great guy, he was at the fed while this stuff was going down. he was part of the clinton administration that deregulated wall street that allowed the whole thing to go down. and yet now he's got gravitas. all of them are tainted, whether it's by bonuses or policy setting. you know, jack lew is one of the less offensive, maybe totally inoffensive thing -- the only thing people are objecting to is the signature. that tells you something. >> what do you make of, say, jeffrey sachs arguing a couple days ago that there's a problem having wall street people going to the treasury because, you know, you've got foxes guarding the henhouse? >> there are two pieces -- actually now like three or four pieces of financial regulation. treasury deals with part of it, but they also have to deal with all sorts of economic policy including maintaining confidence in the financial markets. that used to be one of the big roles that people like bob ruben were to be able to do. there are multiple roles treasury secretary
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)